Symptoms You Should Never Ignore – Eyes

1/20: Twitching Eyelid

Don’t Worry:

When your eyelid starts dancing to its own beat, twitching like there’s no tomorrow, you’re probably good. This is called eyelid myokymia and is normal. It affects almost everyone at some point. The cause is not quite known but it’s believed to be a misfiring of the motor nerves that drive the muscles that open and close your eyes. This should last a few second. Common influences include too much caffeine or alcohol, and ongoing stress. So rest up and take it easy on the coffee and booze.

Twitching Eyelid

Do Worry:

If this twitching becomes a regular thing, esp after a week or two Contact your doctor. If other can easily notice these twitches, where they actually close your eyelid, contact your doctor. Occasionally off the cuff one offs are one thing, but a continuum of episodes, this is different This could be a sign of Bell’s palsy, a temporary form of facial paralysis that affects one in 60 people, or an even rarer neurological disorder called benign essential blepharospasm, which can impair your vision and require medication or surgery.

2/20: Red Spot in Your Eye

Don’t Worry:

Spontaneously, there’s a red spot in the white of your eye looking like a a dot of blood, should you be concerned? Fortunately the scary symptom is usually completely harmless. There are several innocuous causes for this. Firstly, a broken blood vessel aka subconjunctival hemorrhage, can happen from coughing, sneezing or pooping. Medications such as blood thinners can predispose you to having blood pool under the clear protective layer sitting over the white of your eye, and even spread all the way around causing this effect. It usually resolves on its own after about two weeks.

Subconjunctival Hemorrhage aka Red Spot

Do Worry:

Keep an eye out (pun intended) for other symptoms which could appear in conjunction. If it occurs on a regular basis, or if you’re having spontaneous bruising elsewhere, it could be a sign of something more serious—like a clotting disorder or diabetes. That is concerning you definitely need to address with your doctor

3/20: White Ring Around Your Cornea

Don’t Worry:

It’s freaky – the clear layer of protective tissue that covers your iris and pupil, your cornes, has a ghostly pale ring. Being white, grey or even light blue, this can be completely normal part of the aging process. This is called Corneal Arcus. As we get older, the edge between the cornea and the white of the eye becomes more porous, allowing fatty deposits from the bloodstream to leak in. Fortunately this doesn’t impair vision or require treatment.

Corneal arcus

Do Worry:

A white ring could be your first sign of high cholesterol. If you are under the age of 40, definitely contact your doctor to have them run a blood lipid profile to measure your levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and other fats.


Here are 13 eye care tips your optometrist wants you to know.

Based on an article in Reader’s Digest byAnna-Kaisa Walker

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