Posts Tagged ‘Cancer’

Definition of Pain

September 22, 2020

Recently the definition of “Pain” was updated for the First Time Since 1979!!

After 40 years, a multi-national, multi-disciplinary IASP Task Force developed a revised definition of pain that was recently published in the journal, PAIN, along with the associated commentary by President Lars Arendt-Nielsen and Immediate Past President, Judith Turner. The revised definition included input from all potential stakeholders, including persons in pain and their caregivers.


The IASP Task Force crafted the revised definition, along with the six notes, to better convey the nuances and the complexity of pain in hope that it leads to improved assessment and management of those with pain.

• The 2020 revised definition of pain is: “An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with, or resembling that associated with, actual or potential tissue damage,” and is expanded upon by the addition of six key notes and the etymology of the word pain for further valuable context: 

• Pain is always a personal experience that is influenced to varying degrees by biological, psychological, and social factors. 

• Pain and nociception are different phenomena. Pain cannot be inferred solely from activity in sensory neurons. 

• Through their life experiences, individuals learn the concept of pain. 

• A person’s report of an experience as pain should be respected. 

• Although pain usually serves an adaptive role, it may have adverse effects on function and social and psychological well-being

Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French peine (pain, suffering), from Latin poena (penalty, punishment), in turn from Greek poine (payment, penalty, recompense)

A central change in the new definition, compared to the 1979 version, is replacing terminology that relied upon a person’s ability to describe the experience to qualify as pain. The old definition read: “An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage.” This wording was interpreted as excluding infants, elderly people, and others – even animals — who could not verbally articulate their pain, said Dr. Jeffrey Mogil, Director of the Alan Edwards Center for Research on Pain, McGill University and member of the Task Force

Source: APCA current “Comprehensive Toolkit for Heal Professionals 2020”

September is Pain Awareness Month

September 15, 2020

In 2001 The American Chronic Pain Association led a coalition of groups to create the first Pain Awareness Month. These iincluded the NAACP, the Endometriosis Association, the American Cancer Society, various nursing organizations and several FM, CFS/ME organizations They assembled under the umbrella of the Partners for Understanding Pain.

This coalition was committed to raising awareness through mass media, public forums, and other sources so that chronic pain may be more readily recognized, better understood without the traditional stigma attached, and more fittingly treated and managed. The partnership, spearheaded by the ACPA, strived to create greater understanding among health care professionals, individuals and families who are struggling with pain management, the business community, legislators, and the general public that pain is a serious public health issue.

Did you know?

• Nearly 100 million Americans experience chronic pain —more than those who have diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined.

• Pain is a warning sign that indicates a problem that needs attention.

• Pain starts in receptor nerve cells located beneath the skin and in organs throughout the body.

• Living with pain can be debilitating and adversely affect everyday life.

Examples of pain include: Arthritis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Headaches & Migraines , Fibromyalgia, Multiple Sclerosis, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), Sickle Cell Disease, Cancer, Phantom Limb Pain and many more.

Susceptibility

July 20, 2020

Despite what some people think, we DO NOT have a compromised immune system.

People taking immuno-suppressant medications, transplant recipients or with cancer / HIV have had their immune systems destroyed and can not fight off any new invading bug. They have compromised immune systems cuz essentially that system does not currently have much function in their bodies.

Our systems are impaired. So many variables impact each person’s impairment, but we are definitely impaired. Even the lady with only Fibromyalgia & is in long term remission has an impairment, as low as it might be. But she is not as much as the girl next door that has has uncontrolled Lupus and uncontrolled Fibromyalgia. We each have our unique set of variables that makes our own levels of impairment & thus susceptibility different.

IMO, persons with autoimmune conditions are definitely impaired. With these diseases their bodies are constantly fighting with themselves making it difficult to the immune system to fight the real infection as well as the phantom from the disease. So they’re taking a bit more of a hit than those without an auto-immune disease.

& No. Fibromyalgia is NOT an autoimmune disorder. I believe they are now thinking it’s neurological, which makes sense.

IMO, Fibromites, because of our declined health and it’s harder for us to fight off bugs, we also have impaired immune system. Our immune systems are fully intact but because of the impact fibro has on other system, we are definitely at a higher risk than the general public.

At this point I had actually made a list of various medical condition & where I thought they fit on the susceptibility scale. But there are too many other factors, the biggest two being additional medical conditions and the amount of control of one’s conditions.

So, I am only going to rate my own susceptibility cuz I know all my factors. My factors: I have fibromyalgia & about a dozen other issues are, for the most part, controlled. I do not have an autoimmune disorders (or determined to be, at this time). I am, otherwise, in good health.. So cuz I’ve got fibro, I’m at risk, but it’s controlled so that lowers the risk, but I’ve got a whole bunch of other non-autoimmune issues which increases my risk, but I’m healthy, which lowers the risk. So, I’d say on a scale of 1-10, my risk level is at about 6/10.

Remember, I am not a medical doctor and have no medical training. This is just my opinion based on the research I’ve done.