Posts Tagged ‘Osteopathy’

Myth Debunked VI of VI

June 6, 2021

FIBROMYALGIA DIAGNOSIS IS THE END OF THE ROAD

Many find it hard to accept a fibromyalgia diagnosis, not just because of the condition itself but because of what it means. It can feel like the healthcare professionals are saying ‘there’s clearly something wrong with you but we have no idea what it is… there’s nothing more we can do for you’.  This ties into the point of the trashcan / umbrella diagnosis.

Lack of information and fibromyalgia-specific support at the time of diagnosis can leave many feeling like the diagnosis is the end of the road, but that doesn’t have to be the case. The OP was personally told by her rheumatologist not to go online because she’d ‘fall down the rabbit hole’. I imagine the doctor wanted her to go home, give up and stop bothering doctors.

Acceptance, often a difficult and ongoing work-in-progress for many, can be done in conjunction with keeping open mind, still being open to new developments, diagnoses and tests and treatments while working to manage fibromyalgia in day to day life.

Myself, I knew my diagnosis before my doctor’s did (Did the same with my endo), so acceptance was never much of an issue for me. I think my GP had a harder time accepting it than I did.

While there’s no cure, a multi-disciplinary approach can help to some degree. The likes of pacing, pain self-management therapy, massage, acupuncture, gentle exercise, gadgets, self-help books, medication, supplements and so on will work differently for everyone; both the experience of fibromyalgia and its management will be different for each person. It’s often a case of trial and error for each individual to develop a routine and to find the tools that work more effectively for them. 

My regime is a multi-disciplinary approach as mentioned above. I have a muscle relaxer, an anti-inflammatory, low level narcotics, MMJ and a small selection of vitamins. I also regularly see a physiotherapist /osteopath, RMT, pain physician for trigger point injections, & my dentist because of my TMJ, I participate in exercise which prior to covid was Aquafit for the most part. I try to watch my dietary choices, but I know I still fail there- addictions to sugar & McDonald’s. I am also involved in chronic pain support groups in my area which are currently virtual.

What hasn’t worked for me includes Lyrica, Gabapentin, Cymbalta, Fentanyl and Codeine Contin. I have given acupuncture several tries but have not found it helpful for me & occasionally detrimental. My best friend sees a chiropractor but I found that they were less helpful for me. I also still need to be very careful in the way of exercise so it’s not to over do..

30 Facts!!

May 24, 2021

Originally written for the 25th Anniversary with 25 facts,, this is a list of things you should know, from someone with Fibromyalgia. From someone who experiences it, not just studies it. I have taken the original, modified it and added to it from *my* perspective as my experiences with fibro are not the same as hers. OP info available at the bottom.

  1. Every morning is a tough morning.
  2. I can sleep all day and still feel like I just ran a marathon.
  3. If I went out last night, I need a day or two or three to recover — its okay, it was worth it.
  4. When i’m tired, let me sleep.
  5. Certain foods make me flare up, For me that’s items like Ice cream breaded food products (like fish sticks or chicken fingers), mayo & salad dressing, KD, etc.. Some I know why, others no clue.
  6. When I’m in a flare, leave me alone in a dark room but please check in, even if I don’t answer. It makes me feel cared for & loved .If I am flaring and I am responding, I’m likely asking for a ride to the ER.
  7. Yes, diet matters, but in flare mode, all bets are off.
  8. Yes, my face is swollen. No, I didn’t gain 5 pounds overnight… Well I could have gained, but not on my face.. So, Yes, that is a tell that I am in a flare.
  9. I have many different sizes of clothes in my closet to accommodate flare vs. non-flare days. I currently have clothing from a medium ( very generous medium) to 3x.. I’ve lost weight, so likely only a few items & eventually they will go too.
  10. Fibro Fog sucks. Ya know when you get absent-minded every once in a while? Misplaced your keys? Misread something? Forgot to water the plants? That’s Brain or Fibro Fog. While it happens to everyone at some point, it not the norm. For people with Fibromyalgia this is the norm. Every day. I have even lost my train of thought, mid-sentance. It happens enough that those close to me don’t bat an eyelash when it happens. Some even see it happening & will remind me of what I was saying. The worst, is fogging out when I drive & I love to drive, but have to be super careful to make sure I am clear minded.
  11. Ask before you touch. Some days, I can barely tolerate the feel of clothing or even my hair on my skin. When I’m ok, give gentle hugs please — my skin & muscles may still be tender. But if I give you a bear hug, you can give me one back!
  12. Bright lights, loud noise and too many smells can overload the senses and can cause nauseous (or worse) or kick in a migraine.
  13. Allergies play havoc on my body. Scented products like perfumes & body products are typical culprits Sometimes I don’t even know I’m allergic until I experience it, So it’s a bit of Russian Roulette when I go into public because I can’t control what scents other people wear. Food allergies/sensitivities do not make life any easier either, especially when eating out.
  14. I am a human barometer ( there’s a post around about that.. I can typically tell it’s gonna be too cold, too wet, too hot.
  15. Yes, i am on medications, sometimes even alot of them. I have a decent relationship with the pharmacy staff, and I know exactly what all my medications are, the dosage, and why I’m on it & how it helps.
  16. To me, car rides are joy rides cuz I really love to drive. I need to stop every hour or two to keep my legs from going numb or seizing up. It, for me, is so worth it! But so many with fibro feel differently than I do & equate it to a highly painful roller coaster ride.
  17. Some days it’s OK to let my Fibro win. It’s a marathon, not a sprint.
  18. I can get moody. You would be too if you were in pain all the time, be patient with me.
  19. Don’t be surprised if I can tell your mood as soon you walk in the room. My Fibro/spidey-senses are tingling.
  20. My day, week and month are carefully planned to accommodate my Fibro. Only important events & people like you are scheduled.
  21. If I cancel my plans with you, don’t be mad.. Remember, I made plans with you, because you are important to me. I am trying and obviously want to hang out with you, so please keep any nasty commentator yourself as I already feel guilty.
  22. Your friend with Fibro that says they have no pain doesn’t make me feel any better. Plus if they have no pain, they may not have fibro cuz *all* Fibromites have *some* level of pain at *all* times Alternatively they could simply lying either about having fibro or about being totally pain-free. Also, just cuz someone says they are “Good” that’s does not mean pain-free
  23. “You should exercise.” ROTFLMAO. Have you considered going to the gym while you are in the middle of the flu with body-wide aches & pain, fatigue? Didn’t think so, so how can you expect me to when I have body-wide aches & pain and fatigue? Yes, I do exercise, but I’m not a hypocrite. Do you know how long it took from me to go from bobbing in the water during aquafit to get to my current level of exercise? Years!! It helps, that I have lost weight. Before you use me as an example of of someone with fibro who is ‘fit’, remember that I started my journey to become healthier & to increase my fitness level in the winter of 2012, almost 9 years ago. And I would not consider myself ‘fit’
  24. Going to the doctor makes me sad & sometimes overwhelmed— it’s a reminder of my condition. And it doesn’t help that I have at minimum a half dozen medical appointments each month – GP, Pain Doc, RMT, Physio/Osteo therapy, Gyn, Neuro, Dental, Psych, mental health support groups, and one offs for tests like bloodwork, ultrasound, x-ray, MRI or CT.
  25. There are zero no-pain days, but my low-pain days are my happy days. So if I’m looking good and acting good and I’m social, I’m better, right? No, just a good *low* pain day. Fibromyalgia is chronic & will not go away
  26. Because of Fibro, the mandated downtime gives me the opportunity to write this blog, and I’m grateful. Unfortunately, some of that downtime does not even permit blog writing because the pain or fatigue is*too* intense, so I have missed posts.
  27. Because of Fibro, some Fibromites get to spend more time with their families than if they were healthy.
  28. if i am being a dick about my health, you will not change my mind. I have to figure it out myself. For those in my life who put up with that for years, I am sorry.
  29. Because of Fibro, I’ve become part of a strong, supportive community that reminds me I’m never alone.
  30. Yes, I have depression. No, it’s not because of my fibro. My depression started at age 16, but fibro, we believe, started from Mono when I was 19-20. So, obvs they started at different times plus I do know the triggering event that started my depression.

Original published by Puja Rios on May 11, 2007 at https://www.huffpost.com/entry/25-facts-for-fibromyalgia-awareness-day_b_59148663e4b01ad573dac1c2

My Endometriosis Chronological Journey of Symptoms & Treatments

March 22, 2021

Over the years I have been on many medications & have tried various options for treatment. This is a list of treatments, both before & after diagnosis:

Summer 1988 – Menstruation cycle becoming more uncomfortable and occasionally painful. Treatment? Nothing.. I just figured they were just bad cramps.

Abdominal pain considered just ‘bad cramps’

March 1990 – prescribed Ortho 7-7-7 by my GP at my request for the purpose of lightening & regulating my cycles. This medications did helpat the time.

Winter 1994 – Increase of re-occurring and irregular abdominal pain, beginning in spurts. Pain usually, but not always, eased by soft bowel movement. Minimal impact on quality of life

August 1996 – Increase of re-occurring and irregular abdominal pain, still in spurts. Pain less frequently eased by soft bowel movement. Pain/discomfort had some impact on general quality of life.

Autumn 1997 – By this time, due to frequency in bouts of pain, was able to begin distinguishing between different types of pain as well as circumstance surrounding the pain. The abdominal pain and discomfort was beginning to have noticeable impact on general quality of life.

Spring 1998 – Referred to gynecologist who only adjusted my oral contraceptive to Triphaisal. This was changed back in the Autumn due to side effects ( no, I don’t remember or have record of what they were)

November 1998 – Referred to gastroenterologist by recommendation of gynecologist. Within a month I had a colonoscopy and a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. Prescribed Dicetel which alleviated some symptoms. Referred back to gynecologist in March 1999.

Laparoscopic surgery

The next three months were spent pushing my gynaecologist to perform an exploratory laparotomy to confirm, or deny the presence of Endometriosis within the abdominal area.

June 1999 – Diagnostic Laparoscopy resulted in diagnosis and initial surgical treatment, excisement of Endometriosis. She was unable to excise all of the endometrial tissue as she did not have sufficiently long tools to get to all the areas.

August 1999 -January 2020– Quick return of abdominal pain. Prescribed Lupron hormonal treatment who was an ineffective treatment.

Depo Lupron

January 2020 – Full Laparotomy resulted in excision of remaining & new Endometriosis growth and a left ovarian cystectomy. Back on an oral contraceptive, Ortho 7-7-7.

March 2000 – Due to scar adhesion, approximately 12s layer of muscle fat & fascia scarred together. It took one very long and very very painful hour for my osteopath to loosen the abdominal scaring from my surgery. But OMG, the relief when she was done was phenomenal.

July 2000 – began to experience abdominal pain during and immediately before menstrual cycle., A more typical reaction of Endometriosis

Summer/Fall 2000 – Attempted to try accupuncture & Chinese herbal medicine for Endometriosis. The needles, I have found, don’t help me & usually also give me a migraine.. The herbal had zero impact.

November 2000 – began vitamin therapy to help combat Endometriosis & to improve overall health. It helped as a month later the abdominal pain during and immediately before menstrual cycle decreased.

October 2001 – Ceased oral contraceptive to participate in Endometriosis study .

January- July 2002 Participatef in study for Depot Provera. Received monthly shots of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Subcutaneous Injections. No change in symptoms while on the medication. Returned to Orthon 7-7-7 upon completion of study.

Depo- Provera

August-December 2003 – Increase again is abdominal pain level throughout monthly cycle, missing increasing amounts of work. The ended December 25 when I went on medical leave.

February, 2004 – Laparoscopic surgery, cautery of Endometriosis & lysis of pelvis adhesions. Bowel declared ‘immobile’ likely due to IBS.

March 3, 2004 – Start Othro Evra Contraceptive Patch continuous.

April 4, 2004 – Start Othro Novum 1/35 oral contraceptive continuous as patch resulted in breakthrough bleeding..

June 20, 2004 – Start Minovral oral contraceptive continuous as Ortho Novum resulted in breakthrough bleeding

January 2005 – Change Minovral to 3 month cycle due to break through bleed

March 2005 – 3 weeks of severe abdominal pain – Thought to be endo related, as corresponded with menstrual bleed. Took Percocet.

Severe Abdominal Pain

June 2005 – Severe abdominal pain again – Thought to be endo related, as corresponded with menstrual bleed. Took Percocet. Started Yasmin oral contraceptive continuous as Minovral had negative side effects. Was told if breakthrough bleeding occured, let cycle come. Unfortunately, I had three visits to ER for abdominal pain, CT scan showed enlarged gallbladder & possibly an ovarian cyst again on right side.

August 2005 – Abdominal, gynaecological ultrasound. Negative result.

October 2005 – Abdominal, gynaecological ultrasound. Negative result.

I don’t recall what I was switch to next, but it was a continuous oral bcp. Have been on a few other continuous birth control pills since then. Been fairly well.controled since then with occasional spots of pain. Changes were due to side effects and allergies.

Mirena IUD

Currently, I am still pre-peri-menopausal & have an IUD. I was also placed on Arthroyec, an anti-inflammatory, in the late 1990’s prior to any surgery but am still on.. The only problem I currently have is the natural bleed I get due to placement of tiny veins/arteries just inside the vagina. My current gynaecologist cauterizes them once or twice a year.

COVID19 and Me

July 13, 2020

I’ve spoken to many people in the fibro community about this & it seems I’m not the only one deteriorating.. With over 3 months since many of our non-western medical treatments.. So, for most of us it’s only medications that we have access to, and if we are lucky, pain injections..

We are finding out how much our treatments help us.. Massage Therapy, Physiotherapy, Acupuncture, Osteopathy, Chiropractic Care.. For some it’s the ability to exercise when all pools and gyms have closed including even private facilities. I’m sure there are other possible treatments that I haven’t mentioned – remind me of what they are!!

Personally, I’ve lost physiotherapy & osteopathy, massage therapy, aquafit with other exercise at the gym, and the hot tub – God, I miss the hot tub.

But what I am missing most? Socialization..I’m still in contact with friends, and doing my scouting thing, but it’s not the same. I’ve only seen my best friend once through the glass door & subsequently only on Zoom. I haven’t heard from some of my Cub Scouts in months since we went virtual. There are three that despite attempts for contact, that we have not heard hide nor hair of.


Note: the above was originally written in mid-June before we started to re-open in my area. In the last week I have finally had social distance visits with my 2 best friends. I was glad to see them both.

I’ve also seen my RMT, I see my Osteopath next week. And even have my hair appointment with my Mom on Friday.

Now, some pools have opened and the splash pads. Unfortunately, some community & all private gyms like mine are not open.