Posts Tagged ‘Physically impaired’

Chronic Illness is Exhausting, But Add in a Bug or Two

June 24, 2022

No matter what illness you have, it takes more out of you than the average person. Despite what the doctors say, there is some impairment to the immune system cuz you are always trying to deal with whatever disease or condition you have. When that illness includes chronic pain, it takes you right out.

This is something most people, even those who deal with someone in this position or who have an understanding of these conditions, don’t get.

I had someone generously share his bug with me late in January. Since it was one I’d not encountered before, it hit me like a ton of bricks. With an impaired immunity due to the FM  and CFS, not to mention the Endometriosis (which is considered to impair the immunity in some medical circles), I struggled with this. Now, with me also having IBS-D issues at the same time, it also didn’t help matters.   So I spent almost 2 weeks in bed.

People just don’t get how much worse this is for us.. For example, the aches and pains of a nasty cold, with existing aches and pain & things just get worse..

Of course, just as I was starting to feel better from bug #1, it get hit from the other direction with another bug. With an already impaired system from my medical conditions and an overly exhausted body from fighting the first bug, its no wonder I landed back in bed. Before you say I was still sick, I had different symptoms the second time around including a fever. And remember, I was still having IBS-D problems.

People still don’t get why I was exhausted at this point, sleeping 16- 20 hours a day. If I could heal and repair like normal people, in the same timeframe as normal people, I would be able to sleep less & maybe do some stuff around the house.

So finally, I started to get better from the second bug when *wham* I spend the night praying to the toilet god.. Do you know how much vomiting takes out of a body?

So most of that month was a write off for me. Honestly I’m not surprised.

So if you know someone with chronic health issues, especially multiple issues, don’t expect them to bounce back from regular colds & illnesses like healthy people.

What Does a Disability Look Like?

April 26, 2021

According to the World Health Organization, disability has three components:

  1. Impairment in a person’s body structure or function, either physical or mental. Examples include loss of a limb, loss of vision or memory loss.
  2. Activity limitation, such as difficulty seeing, hearing, walking, or problem solving.
  3. Participation restrictions to normal daily activities. Examples include working, and engaging in social & recreational activities,

So as you can see, not all persons with disability have necessarily have a physical component. Additionally, there are medical conditions and disabilities that are not visible including diabetes, lupus & fibromyalgia.

I’m a good example of that in that I have fibromyalgia and other issues but I don’t use a cane at the moment. As a result, I don’t look like I have an impairment . Pain is invisible so they don’t know and cannot tell that my pain level is a 1/10 (I know, very funny) or 8/10 today.

Susceptibility

July 20, 2020

Despite what some people think, we DO NOT have a compromised immune system.

People taking immuno-suppressant medications, transplant recipients or with cancer / HIV have had their immune systems destroyed and can not fight off any new invading bug. They have compromised immune systems cuz essentially that system does not currently have much function in their bodies.

Our systems are impaired. So many variables impact each person’s impairment, but we are definitely impaired. Even the lady with only Fibromyalgia & is in long term remission has an impairment, as low as it might be. But she is not as much as the girl next door that has has uncontrolled Lupus and uncontrolled Fibromyalgia. We each have our unique set of variables that makes our own levels of impairment & thus susceptibility different.

IMO, persons with autoimmune conditions are definitely impaired. With these diseases their bodies are constantly fighting with themselves making it difficult to the immune system to fight the real infection as well as the phantom from the disease. So they’re taking a bit more of a hit than those without an auto-immune disease.

& No. Fibromyalgia is NOT an autoimmune disorder. I believe they are now thinking it’s neurological, which makes sense.

IMO, Fibromites, because of our declined health and it’s harder for us to fight off bugs, we also have impaired immune system. Our immune systems are fully intact but because of the impact fibro has on other system, we are definitely at a higher risk than the general public.

At this point I had actually made a list of various medical condition & where I thought they fit on the susceptibility scale. But there are too many other factors, the biggest two being additional medical conditions and the amount of control of one’s conditions.

So, I am only going to rate my own susceptibility cuz I know all my factors. My factors: I have fibromyalgia & about a dozen other issues are, for the most part, controlled. I do not have an autoimmune disorders (or determined to be, at this time). I am, otherwise, in good health.. So cuz I’ve got fibro, I’m at risk, but it’s controlled so that lowers the risk, but I’ve got a whole bunch of other non-autoimmune issues which increases my risk, but I’m healthy, which lowers the risk. So, I’d say on a scale of 1-10, my risk level is at about 6/10.

Remember, I am not a medical doctor and have no medical training. This is just my opinion based on the research I’ve done.

Not All Disabilities Are Visible

May 13, 2016

Not All Disabilities Are Visible
By Kate Mitchell, May 3, 2016

Original Post: Huffington Post

Too often recently, friends or online acquaintances of mine have been accused of faking their disability. I personally am also disabled. I have autoimmune arthritis, fibromyalgia, anemia of chronic inflammation, and asthma. I’ve been in pain every day since 2001, and over the past 6 years, it has become moderate to severe every day. I experience pain in 54 joints. I am unable to work full-time or go to school full-time at the moment. I take 40 pills a day and 4 inhalers. I’m at the doctor every single week. I’ve had 5 surgeries. But you would never know any of this by just looking at a picture of me. And I’m not alone, as the vast majority of people who have disabilities have invisible ones. But because the majority of people have the idea that everyone who is disabled looks disabled, too many treat disabled people poorly. They shame them, don’t allow them to park in certain places, don’t allow them to use a wheelchair, and more. This is so beyond not okay, and it stems from the misconception that everyone who is disabled looks disabled.

What makes someone disabled? The definition of disabled is “incapacitated by illness or injury” or “physically or mentally impaired in a way that substantially limits activity especially in relation to employment or education.” As I learned while studying for my degree in secondary education, someone is handicapped if their incapacitation is temporary and disabled if it is permanent. For example, someone who has had ankle surgery is handicapped until they recover. If you’d like to read more about this, Emory University School of Medicine has a great explanation.

Everyone who is disabled looks disabled, right? Nope! As the folks at Invisible Illness Awareness Week figured out based on data from the 2002 US Census Bureau, 96 percent of people who live with an illness live with an invisible one, and 73 percent of people who live with a severe disability do not use devices like a wheelchair. This means that when you look at them, you wouldn’t know that they’re disabled. Think about how many people you see who are clearly disabled during an average week. Statistically, for every person you’ve seen who looks disabled, you’ve seen at least 4 more who are disabled but don’t look it.

So how can you tell if someone is disabled? Often, you can’t, so if someone says that they are, you need to take them at their word. If someone looks fine but parks in disabled parking — and have a placard for it — you can’t accuse them of faking it. If someone looks fine but wants or needs a wheelchair, don’t question it.

At the same time, we do need to make sure that people who don’t have disabled parking don’t park in those spots. They also can’t park there with their blinkers on while they wait for someone. If you believe that you should be able to park there because of a health issue, talk to your doctor. If your doctor disagrees with you, don’t park there. If your doctor agrees with you, you still need to wait until you get your placard in the mail before you park there. Anyone who parks in the disabled parking spots without a placard of plate is breaking the law.

What can you do about that? If you see someone park in the disabled parking spot without a placard, call them out on it or write down their license plate and contact the police. People parking in those spots without a placard are breaking the law pure and simple. The more they get away with it, the more they will do it. Oh, and doing this can prevent someone who needs it from going somewhere and doing something they can’t do without the parking. However, before bringing it up with someone, double check to see if they have a placard and you just can’t see it. Verbally attacking someone because you don’t think they’re disabled makes their life already harder than it needs to be.